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to vietnam, he sent no combat troops. >> mismanaged vietnam. >> mismanaged? i don't know about that. i don't know if you have any evidence to say that. >> the diema assassination. >> well, we was aware of that, but i don't know if he was part of it. he walked us back from the brink of nuclear war, he inspired this country, inspired young people to public service and elevated the feelings about what government could do, at the same time, the famous line in the speech. he asked much of the american people. the space program, the peace corp. these are all significant achievements we remember him for today. and so, pat is right. he is frozen in time. he will always be young, he will always be popular, but he certainly shows what a president can achieve. against many odds, too. >> peace corp. was a big item. >> 39 countries, servely his most obvious legacy was creating the peace corp. it was the presidency that was a lot about image. and there are a lot of unanswered questions. would he have escalated the war in vietnam? that is really just unknown and a lot of it will never be known. it is tru
we know what level of efficiency to expect? >> no, we don't. they have been lowering the standards and say it is going to work better than october 1st. and since it was an utter failure, that is really, really low. but the administration has a credibility problem and also is running out of time in order to get these people signed up. they wanted to sign up and needed to sign up 7 million people by the end of march with a particularly strong representation of that number and younger and healthier workers to subsiddize the coverage for older workers. they will have a problem meeting the goal. >> you ponent out the website is the least of their problem. enrollment and credibility. with enrollment what happens if we don't have the magical number by the end of march? >> the people signing up. smaller the number and more likely they are that need health care and older and less healthy people who need more health care. and in february, starting in february, that data gets fed to the insurance companies and february and john, they figure the premiums for 2015 and announce them in september
the policies themselves don't comply with the new mandates from the feds. so they have to cancel. president obama knew that would happen and he actually wants it to happen. because it forces americans into the obamacare exchanges to get new policies, many of which are more expensive. remember, remember. the goal of president obama and the democratic party is for the government to control the entire healthcare industry. that's called the single pair system. if -- single payer system. if private insurance companies get out of the healthcare business the feds take on more power and will eventually run the entire show setting premium rates and dictating prices for medical services. but the president will never tell us any of that. now, the latest poll on obamacare from george washington university says 53% of americans now oppose it 43% approve. so most americans are finally wising up to the quasisocialistic agenda of the democratic party. now, my analysis is not ideological. in fact, as you may know, i think some right wing idealogues are actually helping president obama by attacking him perso
involved. that's where we're at right now with the obama care. i'm not a health care expert but you don't have to be to see what's going wrong. this plan is not workable. why does he not realize that? why are we worried about poll numbers? this is not working. it's a disaster. why does he not acknowledge it? why are liberals marching into the white house to get a message down? why are we having nuclear talks on thursday about 51 votes? this is an emergency. he would defuse a lot of resistance if he would admit this is the point we're at right now. >> yes, bob, answer all that -- >> first of all, for -- let me make a point he ought to go back. there are two presidents who had lower ratings and came way back up. so that's the answer to your -- your point. in this case, you don't believe it works. eric, nobody around this table with the exception of me thinks there's probably some hope for it. obama believes it works. he thinks there's a way. now, you can argue the policy. and if it is impossible, obama's presidency is pretty much over. >> i don't think he really believed it's going to wor
with runups like this, especially for companies who don't make money -- they have a great deal of promise but don't make money -- really back to larry's point about the internet boom and whether we're getting back to that. a lot of good features of the boom, included amazon.com and ebay, still with us today but many others are not. do you worry we're potentially repeating sinful behavior. >> one thing we learned from the past four or five years issue when we put our money to work, there's a certain risk tolerance everybody has, and markets are more aware of risk powers individually and institutions than ever before. the market in great part -- the pricing mechanism we have is developed and is decided upon by the investing public and the reply and demand ratio. so i have to believe that people getting into these things at these prices are happy to be there and happy to have the opportunity to participate or they would not be paying these prices. >> larry, without getting into the valuation of the company, whether it's worth in the mid-40s or whatever, it does raise another question about j
? >> a boomer what? >> boomer -- >> boomer esiason. he wasn't that fast, i don't think. they say it best exhibited the adaptive alacrity of a koala. >> must be an australian thing. >> without being anywhere near as cute as the koala. that's interesting. >> boomer may refer to animals, fictional characters, comics, video games. >> doesn't explain it. >> that's a large male kangaroo. >> that's what we were just told. large male kangaroo. so it doesn't have a pouch then? not all kangaroos have pouches? >> i guess you wouldn't need one if you were male, right? >> unless it was like vestigal. >> if you're male, i don't think you have one? >> i don't think so. unfortunately some of us humans -- you know. we're not carrying babies in our pouch. fisher -- mine's less than it was. you have nothing. fisher will vote next year on the fomz. he wasn't a voting member this year. meantime, one of this year's voting members, yes, jim bullard will join us on set at 7:00 for two hours and we may -- he may be a little different in tone and substance than plausser we talked to on friday. >> they're both haw
of his presidency in his public life. don't forget this is a guy who ran as the change himself. he said we were the change we're waiting for. he was the change. that meant he and his own story embody the idea of community in america. and because of that, he was ideally equipped to help bring that message and reality to the middle class in america and to people struggling to get into the middle class. that was the narrative he built with david axelrod. barack obama has to run a third campaign now and recover the narrative of who he is in relation to what he wants to see happen. which is american community of which the health care plan in its best hopes he wanted it to be. to get it there is the challenge, but to explain the big surround. i think he needs his people back to run a third campaign. >> the same people? >> the same people. i would bring axelrod because because he was the guy that did a great job of helping barack obama exchange his narrative. i think that's what barack obama has to do. he has to explain what he's doing there. what is the why of it? because it's the why that's
's become a friend of mine, glenn beck. very controversial guy. has a lot to say, even if you don't agree with him. he's ever fascinating. i went down to texas last week. fantastic new book out that we'll talk a little bit more. >> how about this, kmart has some of the best commercials. we've been huge fans. do you guys remember earlier we talked about a couple of commercials? one was called ship my pants. and the other was big gas savings. ship my pants. >> but you got to say them fast. >> and big gas savings. >> ship my pants? right here? ship my pants? you're kidding. >> you can ship your pants right here. >> you hear that, i can ship my pants for free. >> wow, i just may ship my pants. >> i just shipped my pants and it's very convenient. >> very convenient. >> i hate these big gas prices. >> sounds like you could use some big gas savings. >> kmart shop your way members save 30 cents a gallon. >> that's a big gas discount. >> big gas discount. >> you solved a big gas problem. >> totally solved might big gas problem. >> all i know is i want to go out with those people, you know, that ca
be delusional, but they are not stupid. they understand that you don't telegraph your agendas because that turns people off. when i was young, stalin was alive, the slogan of the american communism party was -- it was not solve yet america dictatorship, take away the wealth, and distribute it to our friends. their slogan was peace, jobs, and democracy. there is a guru of the left sames saul, people are familiar with him by now, who said. there's one message of the book which is don't telegraph were agendas, lies. that is if you want to introduce a comprehensive state-run health care system otherwise known -- that's communism -- what you do is, first of all, you call it single payer, as though that's a benign thing. it's not benign if the state controls everybody's access to health care can decide what kind of health care you can get, what you can't, and knows all your financial and health information. that's a totalitarian state right there. second, don't sell it as a totalitarian system, but that you're going to insure the uninsured. you are familiar with the fact that obamacare is not going to
. bill: there it is for now and what about it? jonas, good morning to you. did he go far enough? >> i don't think so. that sounded like the most passive-aggressive apology we have heard from a president in a while. bill: you say the was too cute, using a passive voice. >> he said we could have been more clear. that implies they were clear about something and they were honest about something, just not clear enough about it when in reality they were clearly dishonest. they said something over and over again were clearly that wasn't true. he can't admit that. this whole statement doesn't jive with the rest of his statement that these aren't the droids you are looking for. i don't think this will clear the air. i think they are trying to buy time. bill: because? what comes next? >> we don't know what kathleen sebelius is about to say. maybe she says she designed this website in a drunken stupor like the toronto mayor. but it sounds like they are laying the ground work for a website that won't work november 30. he's trying to give the democrats some flexibility that he met with this week. bill
is an icon already. >> is that what the word is derived from. >> i don't know. >> spelled differently. >> not the word icon. i wonder his name. not either. >>> in other corporate news, the government wants bank of america to pay nearly $864 million in damages after a federal jury found it liable for fraud over defective mortgages that were sold in this case by its countrywide unit. government's also asking for penalties against a former mid level executive at countrywide. the jury found her liable as well. and vc firm andreson horowicz has sold a third of their shares. the shares were sold between 49 and $50. that makes the sale worth more than $111 million. kind of interesting that they decided to do that. the firm still holds more than 4.5 million shares. >> what do you think about that? >> at some point he has to harvest some kind of gains about this. he's still on the board, right? he can't leave but he can't hang out -- he can't be in there all the time. >> you know, some people say it's never bad. stocks do go up and they do go down. >> i remember that barons commercial. the mar
of the time not. i have been doing this for a little bit now. if you don't know by now, what i might be able to do, there are a number of directors out there and other creative folks who have said we like what you do and want to work with you. i have to say if there are any people i do owe a good deal of thanks to in the industry, it's the artist. who directors or writers took an interest in my work. i haven't always felt welcomed by the business aspect, by the studios, although that changes as well. artists who for some reason gravitated toward my work. i don't take that for granted. tavis: i wonder what difficulty you have deciding what you want to do. you wrestle with how you are going to explain why you took a particular role, as if somehow you owe me or the viewers an explanation. i guess you feel you have to justify to yourself why you take certain roles, given your politics. this stuff doesn't happen easily to you. you are such a complex human being who has views on the world. sometimes they are controversial, but i wonder, is the process of you choosing roles that fraught with diffic
combat troops. >> mismanagement. >> i don't know that you have any evidence to say that. >> he was aware of that. i don't know if he is in that. the kennedy presidency, however short it was was more than vietnam. he walked us back from the brink of nuclear war. he inspired young people to public service and elevated the feelings about what government could do, at the same time, the famous line in the inaugural speech he asked much of the american people. the state's program, peace corp, these are all significant achievements we remember him for today. patt is right, he is frozen in time. he'll always be young and popular. he certainly shows what a president can achieve against many odds. >> peace corp was a big one. >> 200,000 people. 139 countries. certainly his legacy is creating the peace corp. it is the presidency that was about image and there are a lot of unanswered questions. would they have escalated the war in vietnam. would they have left the conflict to the country to deal with. that's a lot that's unknown. a lot will never be known. he won on charisma and the fact he looked g
insurance for 2014. >> once they get on, they don't like what they get on to and see. i often tell people who are talking about the problems with the website that that is not the real story. but it is the little surprise you get when you do get on and you can surf around that is kindover a joke. >> in some ways democrats have had a relief because they can blame that for the slow enrollment numbers. a lot of americans are accessing the website, and they may be scared away by premium increases. they say it can be a 260% se. maybe they have read the stories about dr. networks because of reimbursement rate that's are too low. >> a number of democrats are saying you have to do something about this, or they're now parting company with him on this, and so much else, that they're clearly reading these polls that are showing a reversal. the wind is no longer at the democrats back and that is something they fear could build as companies down the road start with their workers, right? >> democrats were feeling pretty good after the government shut down because they felt it reflecting poorly on americ
. >> texas is a big state. we don't want to assume from top to bottom the state is incense tich -- in sensitive or blind to what you are doing. are there people in the state that have come to your aid? >>some have. not a ton. we have seen a tremendous amount of creativity and willingness to work. at state government we passed two laws that better protect workers. protections to hundreds of thousand of workers didn't happen before. we still have a long way to go. when we go to the texas legislature and talk about basic things like can workers hatch rest breaks? work outside in 100 degree heat. the last two legislative sessions they said no. >> deon't want to give breaks i 100-degree heat. >> don't want hem them to have legal right. and over a third don't get waume water. employers don't provide water on the work sites. >> how does that compare to other states? >> other states have rest breaks. only thing in austin, the city where one of our offices is lope kated, we have been able to get 60,000 workers through a local ordinance, the right to paid rest breaks. we are going to be f
the president's been shot. and i said to her, don't be spreading rumors like that. but with that, someone came to get me, and we went into the waiting room, you know, with everyone else, and we watched television just like everyone else did. and then the series of orders came to me, because i was medical officer. it happened just as fate would have it. medical officer of the day. and so i got orders to go first to the white house, second to the capitol and third to the grave site. >> let's start with the white house. this was the first time you'd been inside the white house? >> first time i'd been inside the white house. i'd been in the rose garden a couple times. and on the lawn with my camera. and i only have one picture of president kennedy in the rose garden, and he's standing on the porch with someone else. i can't remember who it is. but i had not been inside the white house until that, until i got posted there. and i was -- the body was in the east room. the casket was in the east room. and the greenroom is where all of the dignitaries gathered. the east room runs north and south. the w
entrances to the bridge. >> look at this team of people. >> don't worry, they did this to me one time. >> this is lovely. >> these people are going to come out and they're going to go, clear! did you finally go around? you went through the lincoln tunnel? >> no, we didn't. we went around the whole round about. >> you had to come across the bridge, though. >> we came across the bridge, yes. >> finally came across the gw. >> yes. >> in 20 years, we've never done this, i don't think. >> wow, you look good. >> this is really good. >> amazing. >> andrew probably -- how about the news except there was a big storm this morning. >> it is a bit of a mess out there. in fact, if you're planning on traveling that massive winter storm that dumped snow in the west is now pummeling the east with a lot of wet weather this morning. as you would expect, this is reeking havoc on some thanksgiving travel plans. look out if you're on your way to work this morning, it is going to be a bit of a mess. reynolds wolf will join us from the weather channel in just a moment. you look good. >>> the dow and the s&p
're friends, a grown woman. >> i don't need you talking over me. >> i'm not talking over you. >> nene, listen, listen. let me tell you something. >> no, let me tell you something. as a grown woman, i make my decisions. any friend that i have will never tell me who i can and cannot talk to. >> i'm not saying that. i'm saying as a friend -- >> i'm not going to be thinking about whether she is going to be uncomfortable or not. [ applause ] >> wendy: there were a few things in that clip that i noticed, first of all, you never violate and touch somebody in their space, okay? that right there was a grown woman punch in the face about to happen. and i'm not even the violent type, but don't get in the personal space. i'm surprised nene didn't overreact to that which in my book she would have had a right to. the second thing that i noticed in that clip was that the:(7q fashion queen in the background? hey girl. i watch "the fashion queen." they premiered yesterday, also. plus they had a little mayratho. i saw them on the tv while i was getting dinner together. anyway, back to kenya and nene. so this a
're finally going to vote in favor of plans that don't provide decent insurance. it is kind of crazy. and it shows you, michael, just how far the debate has gone off the rails. the republicans don't know what to do about the 45 million americans without insurance. or the tens of millions of americans who couldn't get good insurance because of pre-existing conditions and scam jobs. so that's a big picture instead we're focusing on what jonathan rightly called a slice of the issue. which is a problem. it's a small problem. but we're not talking about the big issue which is how do we have a decent health insurance system for all americans. >> to your point and speaking of crazy, republicans have denounced president obama for his lack of clarity when it comes to a small piece of the insurance market. yet they have unveiled some of the many lies about the law. here's a sampling from just this year. >> you said it's the most dangerous piece of legislation in the history of the united states. >> yes, i think so. >> i'm asking if you think -- >> let's repeal this failure before it literally
. >> there are some things that are too personal and you don't want to know. >> can you hear me now? >> reporter: the fcc acknowledges that most passengers oppose phone calls and even the chairman says, "i feel that way myself." on the white house website, 2500 people have signed a petition to stop the fcc. delta polled its passengers and found 2/3 said no to phone calls. >> if people are talking loud it may be disruptive. >> reporter: and flight attendants are adamantly opposed. >> i can see it now with a dozen people, can you hear me now? can you hear me now? none of us want to experience that on a plane. >> reporter: why such a negative reaction? researchers found when you are stuck in an elevator or plane and listening to a one-sided conversation it steals your attention, making it difficult to get anything done. [ ringing ] >> reporter: this is just a proposal. even if approved, late next year, it will be up to the airlines to decide if you can make a cell call at 30,000 feet. [ ringing ] >> reporter: david kerley, abc news, washington. >> all right. lots of you weighed in on this issue on
. [laughter] >> i don't think it works for that. >> oh, okay. >> thank you very much for coming. >> yeah. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> i think regardless where you are on the political spectrum, we are fortunate and grateful we live in the united states of america. it's a very unique place, and if america was considered to be a product, and we do try to sell our product overseas, what's our brand? i think our brand is a constitution, the rule of law, and our value system. under that brand and under that value system, there is that notion of equal under the eyes of the law, and i know that brand and value system is the ada, trying to balance the rights of americans with diabetics. >> this is a treaty. a treaty is a law. the emotional and political arguments in favor of the treaty, no one can disagree with these arguments, but the question is, will the treaty have the legal effect that's being proctored by the proponents of the treaty? we don't hear citations to the articles of the treaty. we don't hear consideration of the reports, the concluding obser
become substitute father figures for a lot of americans in society. we don't believe in politicians anymore. businessmen, clergy, intellectuals, you read the objectives. but coaches seem like people who practice tough love who seem like a good father would be. that's to do with their high standing in society. >> you start out talking about a coach you like a lot. who's that? >> frank beamer, virginia tech. i knew as i started to develop the book, i knew portions would be critical. could with done in an ethical dinner. so i spent the 2011 football season with the virginia tech football program. i was in the locker room. i travelled with them and so on. it does not recount the season. is book does not do that. to explain how it is that frank beamer has had to have 20 consecutive winning systems and graduate 77% of his players. if all of the big college programs graduated 77% of their players, college football would not be know tore yous. >> we got interest in this book for the connection to the taxpayer. i want to show you some video from 2006. it's an economics professor, roger noel
, an obama slingshot where the pulling back and off it goes. i don't see how it can get an awful lot worse. i think he may be bottoming out here. you're absolutely right about the trust factor and that it -- if you like your health plan you can keep it and period, that has done him some kind of nixonyan levels of damage. that story isn't going to last forever any more than the shutdown story lasted forever. nothing around politics seems to last forever. but how can it get worse? well, one way they could miss that end of this month deadline, which they inhe have itably will arguably, it will be possible to argue there will be people that are still having trouble. but as obama care kicks in and gradually over months, that will be a story and you'll see obama start to come up a little bit. >> it has to happen for obama to hand it off to another democrat next time. >> rick, to that point of obama care kicking in and hopefully the president coming back, another issue we're starting to hear more about again, the controversy over the requirement that health insurance companies provide access to birt
, but you won't own it forever. and i pray god when the democrats take back we don't make the kind of naked power grab you are doing. >> and yesterday they made that naked power grab. how funny is that? >> in a big way. serious too. because the complexion of our senate, the complexion of how we think about laws in this nation is potentially going to change. you go from violation of democratic principles, right, that would worsen partisanship, that it will ruin our country, that you're praying it wouldn't happen -- joe biden. but mr. president today. yesterday a huge shift so they're against it. and yesterday president obama had a revelation. listen to this. >> today's pattern of obstruction just isn't normal. it's not what our founders envisioned. a deliberate and determined effort to obstruct everything, no matter what the merits, just to refight the results of an election is not normal. and for the sake of future generations we can't let it become normal. >> here's why they say they did it yesterday. because they say the president can't get any of his nominations for the courts past this
like him. i don't know. i fear the death of the medical profession. let's ask our guest. here now is dr. bill grace, also with us tonight, democratic strategist chris cofinas, heather and jim pethokoukis from the american enterprise institute. bill grace, let me start with you. are they just pricing doctors out? is this a deliberate strategy? 20 bucks a visit or -- that's crazy, absolutely crazy. >> they thought they had everything worked out on the front end of this whole deal. and you know what a disaster these turned out to be. i don't think they had any idea what they were going to do on the back end. but no one thought we were going to get more money from this. we were all thinking this was going to be -- if you remember two months ago, i said this was medicaid plus. slightly better reimbursement than medicaid. >> there's a long-term trend here. both for medicare and medicaid, to keep slicing an slicing and slicing down. hospital reimbursements, doctor reimbursements. this is part of that trend. why? why won't they reward doctors? >> basically they compare the price of physicians i
the agreement. the president if you don't want to be cynical, maybe we ought to be happy and think positively. if you hear the president, he says no deal will go into place in six months if they violate any of these. >> right. we should be totally clear about two things. one, this is not just between iran and the united states, this is an agreement between the united states and iran as well as great britain, germany, france, china, and russia. this is really a global deal. also be clear, it's not just the israelis, it's also the gulf states and saudi arabia. i'll make a third point. anyone that i've ever spoken to in the region is that iran will have one because they have the desire and they have the money to pay for it. >> when i was first listening to the breaking news on fox news channel, six month deal seems like it's reasonable because it's a short period of time. you've got intrusive inspectors going in there. the iranians have agreed to this. this is part of the six-month deal. the thing that's interesting is if after six months they haven't followed the deal, what? >> then there's no
to. >> and good news is bad news >> you are right about that. exactly. >> for fighting fires we don't do on our own. imagine if everybody had their own fire service. >> imagine that. the truth is private fire companies were all over america and do a better job. >> you watch liu spend your money. >> our traffic lights are synchronized so there are no traffic jams. >> private parks are cleaner and safer. libraries our better run. much more computerized. a private water system the government could not do to bring clean water for less because the workers work. >> were you goofing off before? >> occasionally. but the left hates privatization. >> that no one to pay for them. >> yes but we just want it spent well. >> privatize the police department and the fire department everything. >> yes. privatize everything. that is our show. tonight. john: privatize everything. maybe i did not mean that i got carried away but there are some things government ought to do. most are listed in the constitution. but this is thin and it makes it very clear there is not much the founders thought what they s
be a better place. i think coaches have become substitute father figures for a lot of american society. we don't believe in politicians anymore, businessmen, clergy, intellectuals, etc. coaches still seem like people who practice tough love. they seem like a good father would be. i think that has a lot to do with their high standing in society. >> you start out talking about a coach that you seem to like a lot. who was that? >> frank beamer of virginia tech. i knew that portions of this book would be very critical of football. i wanted to give a constructive example, too, and show that it could be done under an ethical banner. i spent the 2011 football season with the virginia tech program. i was in the locker room, i traveled with them, and so on. the point is not to recount the season. but to explain how it is that frank beamer has been able to have 20 consecutive winning seasons and yet graduate 77% of his players. if all big college programs graduated 77% of their players, college football would not be notorious. >> we got interested in this book for the connection to the taxpayer. i want
served on this veterans day. we don't have a lot of time. we have wonderful responses. i'll leave you with simply steven crawford. just say thank you. "morning joe" starts right now. >>> good morning, everyone. it is monday, november 11th. welcome to "morning joe." with us onset we have msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. how is it going? >> good morning. >> double down. >> and national affairs editor msnb chris political analyst john heileman. they're co-authors of "double down." we're going to begin on a somber note. the absolute devastation from a super typhoon in the philippines. overnight the first u.s. relief flight loaded with water and generators arrived in one of the harder hit areas. marines and sailors are also helping with the search and rescue operations. up to 10,000 people are feared dead in one province alone after one of the strongest storms on record. itv's angus walker has more. >> reporter: this amateur video obtained by filipino broadcaster abscbn shows the moment of impact. a wall of water 20 feet high by some accounts crashing into
>> ken had one, he says "shawshank redemption". don't mess with that great ending. >> added on too much. didn't need to see them mess with that. >> michael said how about "meatballs 2." why there was a "meatballs 1." >> "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ >>> good morning. it is thursday, which means it's almost friday, november 21st. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set we have the chairman of deutsch incorporated, donny deutsch. you are wonderful. nicole here. >> we have donny in full dress. >> i was about to thank donny to be so generous to my daughter's medical relief fun. >> i'm still traumatized from yesterday. pills aren't helping. >> visiting professor at nyu, harold ford jr. >> i owe you a check. >> will you >> we can get to $100,000. >> incredible. 15 years old raising that kind of money. >> 17. she was so confident. i'm so proud. >> and in chicago, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. joe is on his way in from arizona. he was at the republican association. talking about his book. he'll be stumbling into the door any minute. i don't know h
over by a dumb looking blonde. >> host: do you editorialize in your book's? >> guest: no, i don't editorialize. i think every biographer and editorialize is in what you choose to put in. and, you know, every saint has a past and every sinner has a future. i really try and be, i try and show all sides. this is why i love biography, because you were telling the history of the time and you're trying to give a nuanced, complex picture which is what most people are. >> host: few women in history you right at that the power to stop the world simply by getting married. for five years the widow of john f. kennedy had been the house object of people's admiration and overwhelming gifts. >> guest: i wrote that in 1978. we're sitting here in 2013, and i would stand by that. >> host: did you like jackie kennedy on nasa's after you are finished? >> guest: yes. i think it to go into these books, if not liking her subject, respecting your subject. and i came out of that book with real respect for this woman. she was strong and she was a great mother. and she -- i didn't realize until years and
generation. when you look at this, it really is a line between optimism and realism. i don't want to say it's pessimism, but maybe the country was headed down to a rough period between 64 and frankly 80. maybe it was inevitable whether he lived or died, but you can't help but see this was an important marker. >> i think you guys in your generation, there is the 60s like 1961 to 1970. the calendar years. there is the 60s that gani believe with the death of kennedy. that brought on the drugs and rebelliousness. when he was alive it was frank sinatra and very conventional. it's like mad men if you want to get a taste of it. conventional and guys in wing tipped shoes and having martinis and chasing girls. it was different. after that it was the beatles and a baroque period and it was not happy, but an effort to be happy. >> it is. we can spend a whole hour on this, but i will try to put other stuff in. the good news we get to spend three hours with ow this tonight. good stuff. you can watch both specials. first at 7:00. it will be jfk, the day that changed america. 8:00, watch the kennedy broth
shoulder moves. then i do the wave. i don't want to brag, but i'm good. >> we bring them together for an exclusive head-to-head boogie battle. >>> i loved that line, i don't want to brag but i'm good. >> but i'm good. >> anyway, we love this story so much, in fact, we have brought together that little boy and the famous dancing usher, famous all over detroit, for some good-natured trash-talking this morning and a fresh round of dancing. this is a great story and we'll have it for coming up. >> if there is an award for jumbotron operator, it should go to this guy. this is incredible video to watch. >>> also ahead -- it's raining rocks, literally, the beautiful little town where life looks surprisingly normal in the aftermath of a volcanic eruption, except for the pebbles falling from the sky. >> the record, ginger forecasted the rocks to fall from the sky. >>> also this morning, we have an abc news exclusive. we're behind the scenes with one direction as they put on a marathon, seven-hour live stream for their fans, this is all in advance of "gma's" massive one direction concert co
phonet so you don't interrupt the inven . with that, let me get dirty. i am shannon o'neil. i work at the council on foreign relations very focused on next month america more broadly unedited and pleasure tonight at talking with two wonderful gentleman, who have written wonderful books are really impressive impressive books about mexico. the first one on my right is ricardo ainslie. his book is called "the fight to save juarez." this book tells the story of the border city, which many of you know i've had the unfortunate tension in recent years of being not only the most violent place in mexico, but by some accounts the most spineless in the world. he tells the story of this descent into darkness of this border city through the eyes and through the stories of many people in morris, the mayor from 20,722,010. it is a newspaper photographer who patrols the streets and shows up at the house and the grandstands. it is the mistress of a mid-level cartel operator. and finally a human rights activist that is thrown in to those trying to make sense of it and protects the people inside for
here for a few hours, but we take our time. don't want to rush through. >> how are the deals? >> fantastic. everything is at least 50% off. >> really? >> yeah. >> analysts are saying some may spend more. will you spend the same or less? >> it depends on the person, but i already spent more than last year. it's good. >> how long will you go at it today? >> we are about halfway through the circle. i will have to hit a couple stores again we have been comparing. >> anything for an older reporter-type guy? >> a leather jacket. you can do that. kind of hip. >> thank you. i won't hold you up. i know you have been waiting for a while. they missed a sale at a really high end retailer here. i will get your credit card number afterwards. >> fabulous. >> excellent. thank you so much. have fun, ladies. >> older reporters. don't sell yourself short. thank you so much. the activist groups are wal-mart plans to use this to protest in support over big box store workers. 50 demonstrations are planned across the country. we will dig into a little more what these activists want. we will have an
don't know. but i think where allies are close tapping private phones of their's particularly of the leader, the leader is what i'm talking about has much more political liability than probably intelligence viability. and i think we ought to look at it carefully. i believe the president is doing that and there are some exceptions. >> schieffer: do you think that the national security agency has gone too far? >> well, let me say something about the nsa. i believe the nsa is filled with good patriotic people who want to do the right thing. they follow the orders they're given. the administration controls intelligence. the national intelligence framework is put together by the administration. it begins with the director of national intelligence, it goes to the white house, it's the president, it's the nsc the cabinet and then the framework is formed. now, what happens is, people add to it, state wants this, department of state wants to know this. or somebody else wants to know that. priorities are ranked. as i understand it these are the priorities. one, terrorism. two, support
. >> i had quite a long conversation, at least for me. i don't have many long conversations, but with the president last night, i was surprised when he called me so late, but yes, i feel very comfortable after having my conversation last night that it would be. >> and those new numbers we've been waiting for are low. 106,000 people have enrolled and only 26, 794 of them signed up on health care.com, the federal site. before the numbers were even released house democrats lashed out at their own meeting. voices were raised and there was a little frustration said congressman patrick murphy, but another democrat who didn't want to be named said there is a brewing revolt among house democrats. the white house never has our back on these types of things. they have no plan b and no apparent fix. they're clueless. the president may indeed have a plan b and on friday a vote is planned on a bill sponsored by republican fred upton. t democrats are vying for another sloous solution. we need something to support, they, meaning the white house need to come up with something or many of us
to the negotiating table. basically we don't have a deal with iran and we've agreed to six months of negotiations to get to a deal. and i think if there isn't a deal after six months, the administration has put itself in a box and there will be either very heavy sanctions or military action against iran if there's no deal in six months. >> so high risk, high reward? >> correct. and that's been the style, at least for kerry so far. >> let me play for you what president obama had to say, some more of that from saturday night. >> these are substantial limitations which will help prevent iran from building a nuclear weapon. simply put, they cut off iran's most likely paths to a bomb. meanwhile, this first step will create time and space over the next six months for more negotiations to fully address our comprehensive concerns about the iranian program. >> dafna, this becomes kind of a game of what does substantial mean. there's a big difference of opinion. so the clock is ticking. as we just said, stakes are very high. what happens next? >> well, what happens next is the test and verify. so what we'r
? >> well, i can't imagine why anyone would think that. i don't think vice presidents should come down from anything. only two officers in the land were elected by all the people, the president and the vice president i have never known any majority or senator willing to serve as vice president if his people are willing to elect him. >> nobody thought johnson was the sending most powerful man then. "life" magazine quoted the no. 2 man in washington talking about the president's brother, robert kennedy, perhaps lbj's most bitter rival in all of washington. in all of politics. of course, to call them rivals suggested in the days before fate made him president, lbj was in the same league as bobby kennedy when it came to power, clout, significance. when it came to having a political future. >> that would have been a gross distortion of the concept of a rivalry. months later safely ensconced in the white house, lbj smoke e spoke of the misery he had felt as vice president. >> i did an independent senate, the cabinet had employees under your jurisdiction here. >> all right. >> i don't think that a
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